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1) Why do I need to be Trained?

It has been shown that almost every American will call 911 twice in their lifetime. When you call 911, do you want to wait while the 911 dispatcher tells you what to do step by step or do you want to be able to start emergency care treatment for the ill or injured instead?  You could be wasting precious seconds that might make a difference.

2) How often will I need to be retrained?

Your American Heart Association course completion card is valid for 2 years. However, many people elect to retrain annually...the choice is yours.

3) What are the chances of my actually having to utilize my CPR skills?

Over 1.2 million Americans a year suffer an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest. Approximately 86% of those are caused by a condition known as ventricular fibrillation or VF. VF strikes indiscriminately without regard for gender, age, race, or physical condition.

4) Arenít EMS personnel better qualified to assist a victim of sudden cardiac arrest?

When it comes to CPR the answer is no! While EMS personnel undoubtedly get to apply their CPR skills more frequently, they apply the exact same CPR techniques that you will learn.

5) Can I be held liable if I perform CPR and injure the victim, or the victim dies anyway?

No. All 50 states currently have a Good Samaritan Law which protects a layperson from liability while rendering voluntary assistance to a victim. Provided your actions are not malicious or knowingly negligent, you will be afforded this protection under law.

6) What does CPR actually accomplish?

CPR provides the victim with oxygen and assists in circulating oxygenated blood to vital organs. Without oxygenated blood a person may suffer permanent brain damage within 4 - 6 minutes. More often than not, CPR alone does not reverse sudden cardiac arrest. However, CPR plays a very important role in keeping the victim alive until advanced life support techniques are applied by a trained professional.

7) Suppose I can not remember all the ratios and techniques that I was taught and I deliver bad CPR?

Bad CPR is a misnomer. CPR is only performed on someone who has no pulse. They are dead, and you cannot make them more dead. In other words, any attempt at CPR is better than no attempt. The victimís situation can only improve!

8) What happens if I donít pass the training?

Course completion cards can only be issued to participants that pass all aspects of the training. However, all of our instructors are professionals, and accordingly will work with you remedially until you are able to acquire adequate knowledge and skills to pass the course.

9) Does everyone take the exact same course?

Not always. The American Heart Association has determined that different courses are appropriate for different reasons. For instance, professional Healthcare Providers are required to complete a course that contains more in-depth knowledge than the course that is required of Day Care Providers. Our Staff are very knowledgeable, and will assist you in ensuring that you schedule the appropriate course type for your specific needs.

10) What types of businesses or organizations should make CPR part of their training program?

CPR and First Aid training are important and appropriate for all environments. Our clients represent a diverse selection of businesses and organizations. manufacturing plants, doctors and dentists, day care centers, churches, office buildings, government agencies, scouting organizations, community service groups, banks, construction companies, and more, have all contracted our services.

11) What is an AED?

AED is the acronym for Automated External Defibrillator. The automated external defibrillator (AED) is a computerized medical device.  An AED can check a personís heart rhythm.  It can recognize a rhythm that requires a shock.  And it can advise the rescuer when a shock is needed.  The AED uses voice prompts, lights, and text messages to tell the rescuer the steps to take. Approximately 86% of sudden cardiac arrests are caused by a condition known as ventricular fibrillation or VF. VF strikes indiscriminately without regard for gender, age, race, or physical condition. The only known cure for VF is to electrically shock the heart in order to defibrillate it and allow the heart the opportunity to return to a normal, effective rhythm. AEDs are also useful for other shockable rhythms. When used in concert with CPR, early deployment of an AED increases the chances of a victimís survival by as much as 50-60%

12) What is PAD?

Public access defibrillation is an initiative that helps businesses and other facilities implement programs to reduce the time to defibrillation and improve the cardiac arrest survival rate. Components of a PAD program are training in CPR and how to use an AED, establishing physician oversight for quality control, integrating with the local EMS and using and maintaining AEDs.

13) What is First Aid?

First Aid is the immediate care given to the sick or suddenly ill victim. It is temporary assistance until more competent medical providers arrive on the scene. Even though its temporary, properly applied it can save lives, reduce recovery time and make a difference between a temporary disability or a total disability.


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Last modified: 11/25/13